NASA Mars Orbiter Releasing One of Its Last Rainbow-Colored Maps

Seen are six views of the Nili Fossae region of Mars captured by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, or CRISM, one of the instruments aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHU-APL Scientists are about to get a new look at Mars, thanks to a multicolored 5.6-gigapixel map. Covering 86% of the Red Planet’s surface, the map reveals the distribution of dozens of key minerals. By looking at mineral distribution, scientists can better understand Mars’ watery past and can prioritize which regions need to be studied in more depth.

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Daimler Truck Testing Fuel-cell Truck with Liquid Hydrogen; sLH2 Refueling

Daimler Truck is now putting another prototype into operation to test the use of liquid hydrogenSince last year, a Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck fuel-cell prototype has been undergoing intensive testing both on the in-house test track and on public roads. Daimler Truck is now putting another prototype into operation to test the use of liquid hydrogen. Political support for the development program comes from Daniela Schmitt, Minister of Economic Affairs of Rhineland-Palatinate, who opened the regional hydrogen week “Woche des Wasserstoffs SÜD” with a test drive in Wörth am Rhein, Germany.

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FormFactor Launches Cryogenic Test Service to Dramatically Reduce the Time and Cost for Superconducting Qubit Characterization

formfactorFormFactor, Inc., a leading semiconductor test and measurement supplier, today announced an innovative and new cryogenic test service business model designed to accelerate quantum computing IC development and characterization. Quantum developers can now leverage FormFactor’s state-of-the-art Advanced Cryogenic Lab located at Boulder, Colorado, to characterize qubits and resonators using cryostats with groundbreaking probe sockets to accelerate development cycles by more than 2X, with no up-front capital investment.

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Launch Vehicle Propelled by Innovative Heat Exchanger

Schematic of a LOX–kerosene launcher propulsion system with a helium heat exchanger. Image Credit: Baek, S et al., CryogenicsWriting in the journal Cryogenics, a team of scientists from the Korea Aerospace Research Institute has evaluated the performance of a helium heat exchanger for launch vehicles. Performance was evaluated under real engine operating conditions. 

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With Helium in Short Supply, Scientists Are Worried

Even the U.S. weather service is cutting down on weather balloon use to preserve helium. Credit: National Weather Service.In the basement of the University of New Mexico’s chemistry building, Karen Smith punched in the code to get into the lab she manages. Inside, three white cylinders on blue legs that looked sort of like nine-foot-tall cousins of R2-D2 were humming away. “You’re going to want to stay fairly close to the door,” Smith said. “In case the powerful magnets inside those instruments could mess with my recording equipment. These magnets are donuts of wire, and because they’re sitting in liquid helium, they’ve got a lot of electricity running through them, which means they can generate very strong magnetic fields.” 

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Cryogenic Pumps for Research

Vanzetti Cryogenic EngineeringVanzetti Engineering’s cryogenic pumps have been chosen for the Aria Project of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) in partnership with Carbosulcis S.p.A., a company owned by the Sardinia Region. The Aria Project involves the construction of a cryogenic distillation tower in Sardinia, Italy, for the production of high purity enriched stable isotopes. The project is an integral part of the DarkSide-20k experiment that will be carried out at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS) of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), the objective of which is to detect dark matter directly. Dark matter, the nature of which is still unknown, represents most of the matter that makes up our universe, where it is five times more abundant than ordinary matter that makes up everything we can see today. Understanding its nature is therefore one of the main areas of research in the field of fundamental physics, as it would make a significant contribution to the understanding of cosmology, physics and astrophysics.

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Air Liquide Inaugurates Liquid Hydrogen Plant in Nevada

Air Liquide's liquid hydrogen production plant in Nevada. Credit: Matthieu Giard (LinkedIn.com).Oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen are essential small molecules for life, matter and energy. They embody Air Liquide’s scientific territory and have been at the core of the company’s activities since its creation in 1902. A world leader in gases, technologies and services for industry and health, Air Liquide’s ambition is to deliver long-term performance and contributions to sustainability, with a strong commitment to climate change and energy transition at the heart of its strategy. 

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Artemis I Mission Availability

Image: CREDIT: NASA/KIM SHIFLETTWhen Artemis I is ready to launch, a range of personnel from NASA, industry, and several international partners will be poised to support the mission. Before they get to launch day, the alignment of the earth and moon will determine when the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the uncrewed Orion spacecraft atop it can launch, along with several criteria for rocket and spacecraft performance. 

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Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Rival Aircraft Tech Hurdles

Image: An 850,000-gallon liquid hydrogen storage sphere used to provide liquid hydrogen for rockets resides at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. (Photo: NASA)Of all the various renewable energy sources under development, hydrogen represents the so-called “holy grail” in the effort to eliminate carbon emissions from future aircraft, say many scientists. But while the technology exists today to build a hydrogen-powered aircraft, prompting several startup enterprises to develop fuel-cell-based vehicles for the burgeoning advanced air mobility industry, scaling the production and distribution of hydrogen for the wider air transport market presents its own set of challenges.

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Airbus Facility to Develop Cryogenic Hydrogen Tank System for Future Planes

ZEROe-AirbusAirbus has announced that it is launching a facility based in the United Kingdom, where a new cryogenic hydrogen tank will be developed for its next generation of aircraft. The UK facility in Filton, Bristol has already started working on the technology’s development.

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Taking Charge: Predicting and Improving Energy Storage Materials

Colored regions show a ceramic solid electrolyte microstructure’s interface arrangements, with an atomistic depiction of the interfacial disordered region. Image courtesy of Brandon Wood/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Perfection is a problem when it comes to how computers model materials for energy applications. Although a typical model assumes materials are perfect, in reality they have flaws at their interfaces and boundaries. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, researchers simulate ion transport for ways to predict and improve materials for energy storage.

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QED-C® Announces Four Projects Designed to Advance Cryogenics for Quantum Information Science and Technology

QED-C logoThe Quantum Economic Development Consortium (QED-C), managed by SRI International, in strategic partnership with the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), today announced a $2.3 million research program to advance cryogenic technologies that will enable innovation in quantum information science and technology (QIST). The program aims to address gaps identified by QED-C members as barriers to progress in applications of QIST for computing, networking and communication and sensing.

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Scientists Just Cracked One-Way Superconductivity, Thought Impossible for Over 100 Years

Low Res SuperglidersToday’s computers guzzle large amounts of electricity, raising concerns about the climate impact of technology. A breakthrough in superconducting electronics could reduce the power bill significantly, while also making computers far faster.

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Realizing the STEP Fusion Dream

Fusion pathway Schematic rendering of the proposed STEP fusion energy plant, with cut-away showing the reactor vessel. (Courtesy: UKAEA)Deliver a UK prototype fusion energy plant, targeting 2040, and thereafter a sustainable, long-term pathway to the commercial viability of nuclear fusion. That’s the ambitious objective – and even more ambitious timeline – confronting the scientists, engineers and project managers currently sweating the details for the conceptual design of the so-called Spherical Tokamak for Energy Production (STEP).

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The Webb Space Telescope Will Rewrite Cosmic History. If It Works.

The assembled telescope stands tall with its mirror folded at Northrop Grumman’s facility in California. Northrop GrummanTo look back in time at the cosmos’s infancy and witness the first stars flicker on, you must first grind a mirror as big as a house. Its surface must be so smooth that, if the mirror were the scale of a continent, it would feature no hill or valley greater than ankle height. Only a mirror so huge and smooth can collect and focus the faint light coming from the farthest galaxies in the sky — light that left its source long ago and therefore shows the galaxies as they appeared in the ancient past, when the universe was young. The very faintest, farthest galaxies we would see still in the process of being born, when mysterious forces conspired in the dark and the first crops of stars started to shine. 

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SLAC’s Superconducting X-ray Laser Reaches Operating Temperature Colder Than Outer Space

SLAC laserNestled 30 feet underground in Menlo Park, California, a half-mile-long stretch of tunnel is now colder than most of the universe. It houses a new superconducting particle accelerator, part of an upgrade project to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free-electron laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility, LCLS-II, will soon sharpen our view of how nature works on ultrasmall, ultrafast scales, impacting everything from quantum devices to clean energy.  

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Graphene Quantum Magic Delivers a New Class of Superconducting Material

Nematic-Order-in-Twisted-Bilayer-Graphene.jpgSuperconductors are materials that conduct electrical current with almost no electrical resistance at all. This property makes them particularly appealing for a variety of applications, including loss-less power cables, electric motors and generators, and powerful electromagnets that can be utilized for MRI imaging and magnetic levitating trains. Nagoya University researchers have now detailed the superconducting properties of a new class of superconducting material, magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene.

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Emission-Free Flying on the Horizon

https://cryo.memberclicks.net/assets/news/0222-cw-news-Boeing-composite-linerless-cryogenic-fuel-tank1.jpgBoeing’s groundbreaking cryogenic fuel tank and Airbus’s hydrogen-powered jet engine bring promise to the future of aviation. A new type of cryogenic tank, designed and manufactured by Boeing, completed a critical series of tests at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center at the end of 2021. The successful test campaign advances the large, fully composite, linerless tank for safe and ready use in aerospace vehicles. The reusable tank shell was originally constructed as flight hardware for the Experimental Spaceplane Program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

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Physicists Observe “Quantum Boomerang” for First Time

Physicists Observe “Quantum Boomerang” for First TimePhysicists at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) have become the first to experimentally observe a quirky behavior in the quantum world: a “quantum boomerang” effect that occurs when particles in a disordered system are kicked out of their locations. Instead of landing elsewhere, as one might expect, they turn around and come back to where they started and stop there.

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World’s Largest Liquid Hydrogen Tank Nears Completion

New NASA LH2 storage tank during painting. Credit: CB&IConstruction of the world’s largest liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage tank is almost complete at launch pad 39B at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. With a usable capacity of 4,732 m3 (1.25 Mgal), this new vessel is roughly 50% larger than its sister tank, which is located 170 m (550 ft) to the southeast. Once the new sphere is fully commissioned, these two tanks will provide a combined LH2 storage capacity of 7,950 m3 (2.1 Mgal) to fuel the new Space Launch System rocket supporting future Artemis exploration missions to the moon and Mars.

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